Doc - Lawrence A. Wiedman, PhD

I am a local kid who grew up in New Haven, IN and left after high school to chase initials after my name. Thirty-seven years ago I married my high school sweetheart and most vocal art critic. After being away for twenty years, I moved back to the area into Huntington. I have a doctorate in geology/paleontology and specialize in marine invertebrates especially coral and how to tell if a reef is healthy and happy. Over the years, I have morphed into being a marine biologist and have spent over 35 years of researching the world’s third largest barrier reef along the east coast of Andros Island, Bahamas. I just recently semi-retired from the University of Saint Francis’ Dept. of Biology where I founded and directed the Environmental Science Programs for the past 23 years.

I have been carving for 37 years always using the Mallet and Gauge Method of subtraction art. Most of my tools are over a century old and I only carve dead wood, most of it gifts from burn piles. Art seems to run in my family; both of my daughters have degrees in art and my youngest, Claire, has four degrees in art/art history and teaches it at the college level.

Huntington, Indiana

Sculptures

The Cabbage King - 2020

Inspired by Lewis Carroll’s poem, The Walrus and the Carpenter – recited by Tweedledee and Tweedledum to Alice in Through the Looking Glass, this walnut piece started as a single half ton log.  Using traditional mallet and gouge carving methods this is what is left.  Midway through, a very nasty crack was discovered that necessitated using a second walnut log for the top hat, so , as the Queen of Hearts said "Off with his hat" (sorta)... The show must go on.   The piece's title comes from the poem “The time has come," the Walrus said, “To talk of many things: Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—Of cabbages—and kings—And why the sea is boiling hot—And whether pigs have wings.”

The Cabbage King - 2019

Inspired by Lewis Carroll’s poem, The Walrus and the Carpenter – recited by Tweedledee and Tweedledum to Alice in Through the Looking Glass, this walnut piece started as a single half ton log.  Using traditional mallet and gouge carving methods this is what is left.  Midway through, a very nasty crack was discovered that necessitated using a second walnut log for the top hat, so , as the Queen of Hearts said "Off with his hat" (sorta)... The show must go on.   The piece's title comes from the poem “The time has come," the Walrus said, “To talk of many things: Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—Of cabbages—and kings—And why the sea is boiling hot—And whether pigs have wings.”

A B-REEF Moment in Time - 2018

As a Marine Biologist and educator, I am always looking for ways to share the stuff that fascinates me “at work”. This is a scene that I might encounter in the Bahamas near Andros Island, where I have studied the world’s 3rd largest barrier reef for over 35 years. Each piece is from found or recycled wood and has been hand carved, some you may recognize by former lives. Look closely, you might even see a familiar carving making a guest appearance.

Get Krakon - 2017

Wheeee!!! - 2016

Sassafras log rescued from burn pile. Done by traditional Mallet and Gauge Subtraction Carving Yes, polar bears really do this, although no one is certain why, maybe it is just for fun

I Know How This Ends; I Read the Book - 2016

Madonna & Child - Manatee Style - 2015

Home Sweet Home - 2015

Giddy Up - 2015

No One Can Train A Cat(fish) - 2014

Gene's Friend (Barred Owl) - 2014

On River Patrol - 2013

Plodding Along - 2013

Mated for Life - 2012

Plodding Along - 2012


Titanium Sponsors

Adams County Community Foundation
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